Housing Camp - Summer 2020 Courses

   

 

Click on a Pathway to browse the courses on it...

  

 

construction pathway 


Human Factors in Zero Energy Housing

Course Instructor: Philip Agee

Course Description:

This course introduces learners to the basics of Human Factors Engineering (HFE) and its role in Zero Energy Housing Design. The course does not assume any basic knowledge about Human Factors Engineering but does assume students have a basic understanding of high performance and/or zero energy housing concepts. This course introduces professionals to a detailed perspective of specific topics, including: why human factors is critical in housing, common short-comings of traditional design approaches versus human-centered design approaches, the importance of system requirements, and relevant industry standards to human factors in housing.


Humidity Control in Housing

Course Instructor: Philip Agee

Course Description:

n this course, you will review concepts and applications for humidity control in housing, including design,construction management, and operational best practices for managing humidity in housing. You will explore case studies of real projects with
real solutions, and learn about approaches to data collection and analysis for diagnosing and solving humidity problems in housing. 


Innovation in Residential Construction

Course Instructor: Andrew McCoy

Course Description:

This course introduces learners to the role of innovation technologies in the residential construction industry, including the explanation of theory and application within the realms of innovation, diffusion, adoption, new product development, supply chain management, sustainability, information technology and commercialization.  The course emphasizes application of innovation theories to residential construction innovation and data-driven processes for the industry.


Moisture Control and Durability in Residential Construction 

Course Instructor: Georg Reichard 

Course Description:

In this course, you will explore the relationship between durability and moisture control, learn about the selection and application of materials in building envelopes, and assess real-world examples ranging from retrofits to new construction of high-performing building envelopes, such as those used in Passive House designs or Net-Zero-Energy buildings.  


Pathways towards Net Zero Energy Housing  

Course Instructor: Georg Reichard 

Course Description:

In this course, you will explore different pathways towards Net-Zero-Energy buildings in the housing sector, assess the various energy consumption domains that occur in residential buildings, and learn to identify effective energy efficiency strategies and technologies. You will become proficient in prioritizing and applying strategies and technologies in different contexts, ranging from single family residences to attached and multi-family housing.


Fundamentals of Residential Construction: Construction Documents

Course Instructor: Drew Barnes

Course Description:

This course provides an overview of the core documents in a residential construction operation including: architectural and engineering plans, roof and floor system drawings, permits, plot plans, recorded plats, and building codes. The preconstruction process will be discussed. Various roles of key operational members will be outlined (e.g. owner/buyers, general contract/builders, architects, engineers, the permitting coordinator, site construction managers, land acquisition and management staff, and sales and marketing representatives). Although this fundamentals course does not assume learners will have any prior construction knowledge, it is designed to be engaging for a broad audience at all levels of expertise. 


Fundamentals of Residential Construction: Foundation and Framing

Course Instructor: Drew Barnes

Course Description:

This course introduces learners to the basics of foundation and framing systems in a residential construction application. Specifically, foundation types, parts, materials, and some installation methods will be reviewed. For framing, the basics of walls, floor, and roofs framing assemblies will be covered. The framing portion will also provide an overview of the different framing parts, materials, and some installation techniques. Although this fundamentals course does not assume learners will have any prior construction knowledge, it is designed to be engaging for a broad audience at all levels of expertise.


Fundamentals of Residential Construction: Systems 

Course Instructor: Drew Barnes

Course Description:

This course introduces learners to the basics of residential construction management focusing on mechanical, electrical and plumbing systems. Specifically, the course will review the equipment, materials, methods, and some installation techniques integral to each of these systems. Although this fundamentals course does not assume learners will have any prior construction knowledge, it is designed to be engaging for a broad audience at all levels of expertise. 


Residential Construction Technologies

Course Instructor: Andrew McCoy

Course Description:

Learners evaluate alternative construction materials, equipment, designs, and processes that promise improvements over their conventional counterparts in terms of cost, quality, time, safety, and sustainability. The course provides an overview of conventional materials, equipment, designs, and processes in residential construction and then strengthen learners’ understanding of these primary building systems through residential construction applications.

 

DATA and ANALYSIS PATHWAY

 

Housing Data & Analysis 1

Course Instructor: Mel Jones

Course Description:

Learners will engage with numerous publicly available data sets and conduct analysis to assess suitability of local housing stock, affordability based on housing costs and stock availability, and presence of housing challenges such as housing shortages, long-term vacancies, and substandard housing. Learners will explore the uses and limitations of each data set and and policy and program implications from data findings.


Housing Data & Analysis 2

Course Instructor: Mel Jones

Course Description:

Learners will engage with samples of local administrative data and proprietary data sets that can be used to conduct more detailed analysis of local housing and housing needs. Learners will use this data in conjunction with publicly available data to identify housing challenges. Learners will explore the uses and limitations of each data set and and policy and program implications from data findings. Learners will reflect on solutions to data gaps, considering the local government and developer/builder perspectives.


Humidity Control in Housing

Course Instructor: Philip Agee

Course Description:

n this course, you will review concepts and applications for humidity control in housing, including design,construction management, and operational best practices for managing humidity in housing. You will explore case studies of real projects with
real solutions, and learn about approaches to data collection and analysis for diagnosing and solving humidity problems in housing.


Residential Construction Technologies

Course Instructor: Andrew McCoy

Course Description:

Learners evaluate alternative construction materials, equipment, designs, and processes that promise improvements over their conventional counterparts in terms of cost, quality, time, safety, and sustainability. The course provides an overview of conventional materials, equipment, designs, and processes in residential construction and then strengthen learners’ understanding of these primary building systems through residential construction applications.

 

design pathway


Design Review and Design Principles

Course Instructor: Elizabeth Morton

Course Description:

How can create new housing opportunities that are attractive and innovative, but that still fit in with local contexts?  This module will provide an overview of the theory and practice of design review and some of the key normative and technical principles of good design put forward by local governments, including distinct considerations in historic districts. We will cover special issues relevant to housing, such as infill guidelines/pattern books and design considerations for Accessory Dwelling Units (ADUs). 


Historic Preservation and Affordable Housing

Course Instructor: Elizabeth Morton

Course Description:

In this course we will explore the particular opportunities and constraints practitioners face when developing or encouraging housing in historic districts. Housing is the most common type of adaptive use, and we will examine how older buildings can be modified to suit today's housing needs.  We will learn about preservation review, historic preservation tax credits (often used with low income housing tax credits), planning incentives, and historic building codes.  


Humidity Control in Housing

Course Instructor: Philip Agee

Course Description:

n this course, you will review concepts and applications for humidity control in housing, including design,construction management, and operational best practices for managing humidity in housing. You will explore case studies of real projects with
real solutions, and learn about approaches to data collection and analysis for diagnosing and solving humidity problems in housing. 


Pathways towards Net Zero Energy Housing  

Course Instructor: Georg Reichard 

Course Description:

In this course, you will explore different pathways towards Net-Zero-Energy buildings in the housing sector, assess the various energy consumption domains that occur in residential buildings, and learn to identify effective energy efficiency strategies and technologies. You will become proficient in prioritizing and applying strategies and technologies in different contexts, ranging from single family residences to attached and multi-family housing.  

 

finance pathway


Federal Rental Assistance Policies

Course Instructor: Hyojung Lee

Course Description:

This course provides a broad understanding of historic and contemporary issues related to federal rental assistance programs such as public housing, privately-owned subsidized housing, Low Income Housing Tax Credits, and vouchers. In this course, you will examine the socio-economic, political, and institutional context for the policy development and evaluate public responses to housing problems.  Assessing relative merits and trade-offs inherent in alternative approaches, you will be able to develop potential policy levers for addressing current rental affordability issues.


Historic Preservation and Affordable Housing

Course Instructor: Elizabeth Morton

Course Description:

In this course we will explore the particular opportunities and constraints practitioners face when developing or encouraging housing in historic districts. Housing is the most common type of adaptive use, and we will examine how older buildings can be modified to suit today's housing needs.  We will learn about preservation review, historic preservation tax credits (often used with low income housing tax credits), planning incentives, and historic building codes. 


Low Income Housing Tax Credits

Course Instructor: Thomas Skuzinski

Course Description:

The Low Income Housing Tax Credit remains the dominant supply-side affordable housing policy. This course provides an introduction to the tool suitable for those interested in LIHTC as both a policy and development tool. Topics include federal regulations, state regulations, Qualified Allocation Plans, tax credit equity calculation, and innovative practices such as LIHTC twinning.

 

law pathway


Local Housing Policy

Course Instructor: Mel Jones

Course Description:

This course will review major tools local governments have to address local and regional housing challenges. Students will learn about the importance of housing policies and programs to individuals, families, businesses, communities, regions and the state. Students will engage with real local-government cases and look for solutions to specific housing challenges and learn about how the communities effectively addressed or failed to address the housing challenge at hand.


Low Income Housing Tax Credits

Course Instructor: Thomas Skuzinski

Course Description:

The Low Income Housing Tax Credit remains the dominant supply-side affordable housing policy. This course provides an introduction to the tool suitable for those interested in LIHTC as both a policy and development tool. Topics include federal regulations, state regulations, Qualified Allocation Plans, tax credit equity calculation, and innovative practices such as LIHTC twinning.


Federal Rental Assistance Policies

Course Instructor: Hyojung Lee

Course Description:

This course provides a broad understanding of historic and contemporary issues related to federal rental assistance programs such as public housing, privately-owned subsidized housing, Low Income Housing Tax Credits, and vouchers. In this course, you will examine the socio-economic, political, and institutional context for the policy development and evaluate public responses to housing problems.  Assessing relative merits and trade-offs inherent in alternative approaches, you will be able to develop potential policy levers for addressing current rental affordability issues.


Fundamentals of Residential Construction: Construction Documents

Course Instructor: Drew Barnes

Course Description:

This course provides an overview of the core documents in a residential construction operation including: architectural and engineering plans, roof and floor system drawings, permits, plot plans, recorded plats, and building codes. The preconstruction process will be discussed. Various roles of key operational members will be outlined (e.g. owner/buyers, general contract/builders, architects, engineers, the permitting coordinator, site construction managers, land acquisition and management staff, and sales and marketing representatives). Although this fundamentals course does not assume learners will have any prior construction knowledge, it is designed to be engaging for a broad audience at all levels of expertise. 

 

policy pathway


Local Housing Policy

Course Instructor: Mel Jones

Course Description:

This course will review major tools local governments have to address local and regional housing challenges. Students will learn about the importance of housing policies and programs to individuals, families, businesses, communities, regions and the state. Students will engage with real local-government cases and look for solutions to specific housing challenges and learn about how the communities effectively addressed or failed to address the housing challenge at hand.


Low Income Housing Tax Credits

Course Instructor: Thomas Skuzinski

Course Description:

The Low Income Housing Tax Credit remains the dominant supply-side affordable housing policy. This course provides an introduction to the tool suitable for those interested in LIHTC as both a policy and development tool. Topics include federal regulations, state regulations, Qualified Allocation Plans, tax credit equity calculation, and innovative practices such as LIHTC twinning.


Federal Rental Assistance Policies

Course Instructor: Hyojung Lee

Course Description:

This course provides a broad understanding of historic and contemporary issues related to federal rental assistance programs such as public housing, privately-owned subsidized housing, Low Income Housing Tax Credits, and vouchers. In this course, you will examine the socio-economic, political, and institutional context for the policy development and evaluate public responses to housing problems.  Assessing relative merits and trade-offs inherent in alternative approaches, you will be able to develop potential policy levers for addressing current rental affordability issues.


Fundamentals of Residential Construction: Construction Documents

Course Instructor: Drew Barnes

Course Description:

This course provides an overview of the core documents in a residential construction operation including: architectural and engineering plans, roof and floor system drawings, permits, plot plans, recorded plats, and building codes. The preconstruction process will be discussed. Various roles of key operational members will be outlined (e.g. owner/buyers, general contract/builders, architects, engineers, the permitting coordinator, site construction managers, land acquisition and management staff, and sales and marketing representatives). Although this fundamentals course does not assume learners will have any prior construction knowledge, it is designed to be engaging for a broad audience at all levels of expertise. 

For professionals

  • Register today! The cost per course is just $500, with no additional material costs. 
  • Read our Welcome Guide to learn more about our innovative curriculum. 
  • Click here to join our online community.

 

For graduate students

  • Courses can be found on Timetable for summer semester under GRAD 5984 SS: Housing Camp. 
  • Courses run during the second six weeks of Summer session.
  • Click here to join our online community!

 

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